Sun City

Jodhpur is known as the Sun City for the bright,sunny weather it enjoys all year. It is also referred to as the Blue City due to the blue-painted houses around the Mehrangarh Fort.

Jodhpur is known as the Sun City for the bright,sunny weather it enjoys all year. It is also referred to as the Blue City due to the blue-painted houses around the Mehrangarh Fort. There is a world of wonder in Jodhpur with it beautiful fortresses and glorious monuments, garishly painted houses and where every turn gives us a view of its historical grandeur. The city of Jodhpur falls in the state of Rajasthan and is well connected by major highways. In 1459, the chief of the Rathore clan, a man named Rao Jodha founded this city.  A number of historical monuments adorn Jodhpur.  The Mehrangarh Fort is the most famous one. It lies at the outskirts of the city and is perched on the top of a 125 m high hill. The construction was commissioned by Rao Jodha in 1459, but only during the time of Jaswant Singh 200 years later did the construction really stop. The walls of the fort are up to 36 m high and 21 m wide. The Umaid Bhawan Palace is another imposing structure. A little more than one million square feet of the finest marble was used in the building of this palace. A special type of sandstone, called Chittar was also used for decoration purposes. But a trip to Jodhpur is not complete with curious ramblings in its vibrant bazaar (marketplace) where there are amazing Rajasthani handicrafts items on sale.

Attractions in Jodhpur, around and from Jodhpur

  • Jaswant Thada The Jaswant Thada is architectural landmark found in Jodhpur. It is a white marble memorial built in 1899 in memory of Maharja Jaswant Singh II.

  • Mehrangarh Fort Mehrangarh Fort, Jodhpur is one of the largest forts in forts. It is also the most magnificent fort in Jodhpur, infact, in the whole Rajasthan.

  • Umaid Bhawan Palace Umaid Bhawan Palace is unabashedly the most magnificent palace in India. The palace built by Maharaja Umaid Singh who ruled from 1911-47 was the last expression of princely architectural extravaganza